Thursday, October 23, 2008

4 Reasons to Vote NO on Ohio Issue 2

Four Reasons to Vote NO on Ohio Issue 2:

1. It would cost Ohio taxpayers $400 million.

2. It would allow the State of Ohio to acquire more land, which would cost taxpayers even more in the future to keep up. State ownership of land is not needed in Ohio.

3. It is not right to raise taxes to pay for environmental clean up. If either privately owned or state owned land has lost value due to the actions of another party, then THEY should be required to pay just compensation, not the taxpayer!

4. Restoring private property rights is the most environmentally sound policy because private owners respect their own land more than government bureaucrats. Revitalization is only worth it if someone is willing to spend their own money on it.

Vote NO on issue 2.

Also vote NO on issue 1 (here is why) and YES and issue 3 (here is why). Reasons to vote no on issues 5 and 6 have already been discussed on this blog (here and here).

4 comments:

Zack said...

Im sorry if this affends you in any way but do you know what youve done? You've destroyed my future in grade school. Thanks to you neither me or my friends have a future.In school did you have almost all of your priveldges taken from you? if not you dont know what it feels like. Thanks for listening

LISADS60 said...

If you oppose animal abuse, vote NO on Issue 2 this November.

PageJ said...

This is absurd. Issue 2 only proposes to create a 13 person board of individuals specifically appointed to set standards for livestock and poultry care- NOT a 13 person board of sadistic animal haters set to terrorize cattle.

Any meetings will be open to public questions and comments; you can hurl your misinformed propaganda at them, there.

Nick said...

Page, since you're so familiar with the absurd - do you seriously believe that a board of political appointees' priority will be the care of livestock? Their sole concern will be to carry out the wishes of those who appointed them. This will only result in Ohio writing into our constitution a mandate for special interests.

Corporate mega-farms, not small farmers, will control standards in Ohio. Our elected legislature will have no avenue to reverse any actions by these unelected appointees. When thousands of animals are allowed be caged together in too small spaces, you'll smell the result in your community, no matter how far from these properties you live. You may then rethink your position, but it will be too late.